Einkorn. Celiac Friendly Wheat? +Bread Recipe

Einkorn Wheat has been around since the Neolithic era, approximately 18,000 years! It’s an Ancient Grain packed full of nutrients that hasn’t been tainted by genetic mutilation. Its integrity has been preserved, but does it stand the test of time?

According to recent studies, people who have celiac disease are often able to eat Einkorn Wheat without any issues, due to the fact that it has no trace of gliadin, an essential class of proteins that make up gluten. It’s these T-cells in modern wheat that causes the negative autoimmune response in celiac and gluten intolerant individuals.

Wheat was originally hybridized during the 20th century, to produce higher yields and create a more hearty crop. This was done in an effort to combat famine and world hunger. Today, wheat continues to be changed and altered to combat new diseases and pests that are growing stronger because of this altering of nature. This is why we see a growing number of people today with intolerance’s and allergies to gluten and wheat products.

I am one of those people.

I have not been diagnosed with celiac disease, however, I do have a strong gluten intolerance. Whenever I eat it, I develop a migraine, uncomfortable bloating and gas, and constipation.

I heard about Einkorn wheat from a recent documentary, Sustainable.

I’m a naturalist. I believe we should follow nature’s natural wisdom and not taint the harmony and balance it create a without our intervention and control. Naturally, when I heard about an Ancient Grain my ancestors thrived on that even celiac people could enjoy, my interest was instantly peaked.

I immediately went to the health food store I work at and bought a bag of Einkorn All-Purpose Flour (I’m amazed it was that easy to track down).

I brought my flour home and went to work on making myself “authentic” Whole Wheat Bread. I had to know if this would leave me feeling in pain, or perfectly fine afterwards.

A couple hours of hard work and lots of love paid off.

I had my bread.

And it was perfect. It has been three days since I tried it and I feel perfectly fine. No headache. No inflammation. No gas or bloating. No constipation.

I deem this experiment an official success.

For those of you who are curious as I am, I left the recipe below for you to try out for yourself!

Einkorn Bread (Vegan)

Ingredients

1

cup Water, room temperature
3 1/2 cups All-purpose Einkorn Flour
2 tsp Active Dry Yeast
1/4 cup Molasses
2 tbsp Melted Coconut Oil
1 tsp Celtic Sea Salt

Instructions

  • In a large bowl, sprinkle the active dry yeast over the water. Let the mixture rest for about 5 minutes. You’ll notice that the yeast begins to foam and sink.
  • Whisk in the molasses, melted coconut oil, and sea salt. Add the flour, and stir with a wooden spoon until it becomes stiff.
  • Use your fingertips to bring the rest of the flour into the dough mixture. Don’t mess with it too much, or else it won’t rise well. This dough will feel and look very

    sticky once mixed.

  • Cover the dough with a towel, and let it rest and double in size for an hour up to overnight. Keep in a cool, dry place to prevent it from becoming stickier.
  • After the dough has rested, coat your hands with a bit of flour (to prevent the dough from sticking) and form the dough into a loaf. You can add some more flour onto the dough if it is too sticky, but still try not too overwork it.
  • Place the loaf in a standard-size bread pan that has been greased or lined with parchment paper. Preheat the oven to 375 F. Cover the bread with a towel, and allow it to rest for 30 minutes so that is may double in size again. After 30 minutes, place the bread in the center of the oven and bake for approximately 30-40 minutes, until golden.
  • Allow to cool to room temperature before slicing to prevent the bread from sinking. Enjoy!

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